Web 2.0 backlash

Ahh, an interesting matchup going on with a famous community-driven website:

Digg users vs. Digg the company

site: Digg front page
winner: Digg users (at least for now)

Digg - Technology (20070502)

I feel sorry for digg, but you know what they say:

Live by the geek, die by the geek.

I suspect, the more digg fights it, the worse they’ll lose.

(my favorite on the page: Though a lot of the others are/were quite creative. I had to laugh.)

Published by

tychay

light writing, word loving, ❤ coding

5 thoughts on “Web 2.0 backlash”

  1. IANAL but somehow I feel that digg might win this one under some sort of ISP/common carrier exception. At the point I screenshotted it, it was pretty clear that there was no way they can win against their users short of shuttering the doors and it was also clear that digg the company wasn’t the one posting this information.

    (Personally, I’d think that a company could/should only respond to very specific request for takedown when it is issued from a 3rd party—a blanket takedown doesn’t really make sense (DMCA disagrees). Also, there seems to be a problem between “burying” and takedown which I hope they tried to convey to the AACS. You know, because the outcome was definitely not what the they wanted.)

    BoingBoing thinks they have a strategy, but Cory’s use of the English language in this instance is especially poor—that’s especially ironic for a published writer:
    “I think another way of doing this would be to take down each user post on receipt of a takedown notice, then post PDFs of each takedown notice that he received in their place, which PDFs will contain the magic number. That way, the information stays alive and Digg doesn’t get sued.”

    The larger problem, of course, is that there seem to be a lot of issues with the way DMCA was written. Oh well. It keeps the lawyers and politicians employed and idiots like me just speculating. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *